Went to City Hall to get copies of building permits issued for Mark Conlee’s property redevelopment. – Poisoned By My Neighbor From Hell in Montrose, Lee County, Iowa

After being told by Mayor Dinwiddie that this was a private issue I went to City Hall. I got copies of the building permits on file for Mark Conlees new garage and his new home. This one for his new home.

 

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In the circled area Value is handwritten $40,880 Fee $ is blank. The issue date at the top is 7-12-2004. Complainant had only noticed that this permit was invalid due to no Builders signature. Clearly Building Administrator Holland was intentionally negligent at least for his lack of oversight and pre-approval of issuance of this permit

Went to City Hall to get copies of building permits issued for Mark Conlee’s property redevelopment.

After being told by Mayor Dinwiddie that this was a private issue I went to City Hall. I got copies of the building permits on file for Mark Conlees new garage and his new home. This one for his new home immediately caught my attention.

 

slide0002_image002

In the circled area Value is handwritten $40,880 Fee $ is blank. The issue date at the top is 7-12-2004. Complainant had only noticed that this permit was invalid due to no Builders signature. Clearly Building Administrator Holland was intentionally negligent at least for his lack of oversight and pre-approval of issuance of this permit

Oath of Office – Deprivation of Rights – Color of Law – Treason – YouTube

Oath of Office – Deprivation of Rights – Color of Law – Treason – YouTube.

Iowa Code 729

29.5 VIOLATION OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS — PENALTY.

  1. A person, who acts alone, or who conspires with another person

or persons, to injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate or interfere

with any citizen in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or

privilege secured to that person by the constitution or laws of the

state of Iowa or by the constitution or laws of the United States,

and assembles with one or more persons for the purpose of teaching or

being instructed in any technique or means capable of causing

property damage, bodily injury or death when the person or persons

intend to employ those techniques or means in furtherance of the

conspiracy, is on conviction, guilty of a class “D” felony.

A person intimidates or interferes with another person if the act

of the person results in any of the following:

a. Physical injury to the other person.

b. Physical damage to or destruction of the other person’s

property.

c. Communication in a manner, or action in a manner, intended

to result in either of the following:

(1) To place the other person in fear of physical contact which

will be injurious, insulting, or offensive, coupled with the apparent

ability to execute the act.

(2) To place the other person in fear of harm to the other

person’s property, or harm to the person or property of a third

person.

  1. This section does not make unlawful the teaching of any

technique in self-defense.

  1. This section does not make unlawful any activity of any of the

following officials or persons:

a. Law enforcement officials of this or any other

jurisdiction while engaged in the lawful performance of their

official duties.

b. Federal officials required to carry firearms while engaged

in the lawful performance of their official duties.

c. Members of the armed forces of the United States or the

national guard while engaged in the lawful performance of their

official duties.

d. Any conservation commission, law enforcement agency, or

any agency licensed to provide security services, or any hunting

club, gun club, shooting range, or other organization or entity whose

primary purpose is to teach the safe handling or use of firearms,

archery equipment, or other weapons or techniques employed in

connection with lawful sporting or other lawful activity.

via Iowa Code 729.

Conflicts of Interest in Land Use Decision-Making – eXtension

Conflicts of Interest in Land Use Decision-Making

Elected and appointed officials involved in land-use decision making must not be tainted with prejudice regarding on matters that come before them. Such prejudice exists when the individual finds herself with a conflict of interest. A conflict of interest arises when a public servant is in the position of deciding between public duty and private interests. The three most common conflict of interest situations are (1) when the member is in a position to gain financially from the decision being rendered, (2) when the member is a relative of an interested party, or (3) the member is near, or next to, the property at issue.

The most obvious example of a financial conflict is when a land-use decision-maker has an ownership interest in the property that is the subject of the requested action. A review of court cases from around the country reveals numerous other possible conflict situations:

  • The decision-maker is in a business relationship with the applicant.
  • The decision-maker is employed by a company that stands to gain from approval of the development proposal.
  • The decision-maker owns property near the property in question.
  • The member owns a business that would directly compete with the applicant’s business.

The tangle of familial relationships that can potentially give rise to conflict of interest questions is equally broad:

  • The decision-maker’s spouse is the Realtor working with the landowner.
  • The decision-maker’s close relative lives near the property in question.
  • The member’s nephew is an attorney with the firm representing the applicant.

 

A decision-maker who questions whether he has a conflict of interest should ask for advice from the attorney representing his city or county. If a conflict of interest does in fact exist, the decision-maker must disqualify himself from the case. If a conflict of interest does not exist, it is the decision-maker’s duty to participate and vote, even if the situation may be uncomfortable because it involves a friend or associate.

Many communities, boards or commissions have adopted bylaws or policies that govern conflict, and some state codes require specific action to be taken where conflict of interest may exist. Care should be taken to follow any applicable standards in effect locally. While the advice to confer with legal counsel is always sound, some communities require that potential conflict of interest issues be declared and discussed at an open meeting and a vote taken to determine if an actionable conflict is present. Again, local practice should be followed when applicable. In addition, many local and national planning organizations provide models and standards for resolving conflict of interest issues.

Gary D. Taylor, Iowa State University